Where does the evidence come from?

“All of the high level medical evidence is flawed because it only reflects what happens at institutions that are big enough to do research. I’d like to call this institutional bias or academic bias, but those titles are both taken by other concepts. For lack of a better term, let’s call it research hospital bias.” – 

loving mother adoring baby after waterbirth

While my personal anecdotal data is of course a very small sample, I find it so confusing, and sometimes frustrating when the newest research provides “evidence” against what I feel is true in my bones. For instance the recent study that says a low-risk person less likely to have a cesarean birth if medically induced at 39 weeks.  Our very own Lisa Kane Low, is quoted in this NRP article! She brings up an important point that while the risk does appear lower, the actual risk decrease is VERY low, and might not actually be in the mother’s or baby’s best interest, Especially if the mother is very fearful of a c-section, and that is informing her choices.  Thank you Lisa for your insight.
This article Midwifery Today article touches on one of my issues with all this evidence coming out. I think it’s reasonable to think “If we mess up how mammals labor, it’s safer to mess with it even more”.
 
Anyway… Thoughts?
 

Doula Katy #1

Doula Katy, pt 1

Hi y’all! My name is Katy Gladwin. This post is just a start, but I’m going to try to tell you who I am, and why I think the way I do.

Katy Gladwin sisters
Me and my sisters!

I grew up in Michigan from the age of 5 and have lived here my whole life (minus a year in Nashville, but that’s an entirely different post). I have 3 little sisters, all of whom are amazing, smart beautiful women who I love dearly. We are all close, and feel very lucky to have them in my life.

I am married to a smart, driven, project and outdoors loving engineer. It’s because of him and his support that I’ve been able to be a doula, continue my education, while also being a mostly stay-at-home/work-from-home mom. We built an awesome house in rural Ypsilanti, which just over a mile from the city center. Building a house from scratch is quite an undertaking, that I don’t recommend taking up lightly. I did not quite realize how much work and thought goes into designing, then planning, then building a home. It took a couple years in the planning phase, but once we got to building, it took shape fast and now, we live in a house that we designed ourselves, for ourselves, in the woods. Looking back, it’s pretty fantastic what we were able to accomplish.

Gladwin house in the woods

My partner and I have an almost 5 year old son who is, 98% of the time, pretty much the coolest kid ever. He is empathetic, sweet, super goofy, smarter than us both, and an introvert like me. He makes even the hardest days joyful.

I’ve been Doula Katy for 7 years!

Katy, ZOG and Ross Gladwin
My little family

Never once have a thought maybe this isn’t the right job for me. I love love love this work! When I was in college, studying and preparing myself for the MCATs, I was so looking forward to being able to help people! I was looking forward to working with people to heal themselves, to listening and learning. I was also dreading the years of hazing and indoctrination that goes along with med school. For many this is just part of the plan to become a doctor, for me, I was worried it would hurt my ability to be critical, to question the systems set in place, not to mention the staggering debt. When I learned that being a doula was even a thing, I was sold! A profession where I get to listen and learn, empower and advocate… I am in!

It was one of the best decisions I have made in my entire life. While it can be frustrating to see births go sideways in an individual basis, overall, I love this job with all my heart. I love the families I have had the honor of working with. I love the care providers I have gotten to know over the years. I love the nurses I get to work along side. While 90% of the births I have attended are in the hospital, I extra love that I have the opportunity to attend home-births as an assistant as well.  This helps me remember that birth works.

I learn something at every birth I go to. A new amazing phrase to use with laboring families, a magic trick to help a swollen cervix disappear, a new medical procedure to talk to mothers about, or a new way to advocate.  I take all of this and can share it with the families I work with.  Help them prepare and create a vision for a good birth.  I’m so grateful!

to be continued…

Our Doula Toolbox

Michigan Doula and Baby
Couldn’t pick a pattern, so Ari decided on tie dye and snake-skin for visiting with this little one.
It was recently World Doula Week, and the two of us took the opportunity to do some extra reflecting on our work as Doulas and the support we provide. One prompt for a World Doula Week photo challenge was “tool you use the most.” If you know me, you know I’ve never been able to pick just one thing, whether it be ice cream flavors, favorite colors, or patterns in an outfit. So instead of posting about a tool we use the most, we thought we would (playfully) share a handful of tools that we keep in our Doula toolbox. Our Doula Toolbox is part mythical creature, part mushy feelings, but 100% true (anecdotally). It contains the following:

  1. Hands: they are great because we carry them with us wherever we go, and we use them at every birth we attend! They are also one of the more concrete tools on this list. Whether we are using them for hip-squeezing, hand-holding, bath-drawing, or cold-washcloth-prepping they are never without a job at a birth. Even when we are being “hands-off”, and maybe our hands are knitting, they have an impact on the tone of the space.
  2. Hearts: our hearts are in this work. I still cry at every birth. It’s a powerful transition to hold space for.
  3. Ears: What do you want this birth experience to be for you, for your partner, for your little ones, for your family? Listening to our clients is one of the most profound things we can do. We are there to support our clients in their birth wishes, whatever that might look like, and the only way to know is to listen.
    rebozo
    Rebozos!
  4. Minds: we like to think that we are two pretty smart cookies; thinking fast on our feet, putting thought into the resources we cultivate. Between the two of us we have a lot of experience and know-how to offer.
  5. Water: For your insides and your outside. It can provide amazing pain relief in the form of the tub or the shower. It is also important to stay hydrated throughout labor (and pregnancy) because a dehydrated uterus does wonky things.
  6. BONUS: Rebozo! Probably the most recent addition to our respective toolboxes, but already a much-loved one. This marvelous piece of fabric helps us to work smart as well as hard. It’s not only functional, but also beautiful and has a fascinating history.

What tools did you find most useful during labor(s) and birth(s)?

Giving Thanks

We, Ariana and Katy, would like to show our gratitude to all of our family, friends and community for supporting us as we work to grow this business to support our families.  Thank you to the mothers and families who have trusted us to come into the birth rooms to hold space and support.  We never take that honor lightly.  Thank you to all the clients who have become great friends!

doula selfie
Thankful doulas

We thought we would list out a few things we are each grateful for this fall.
I am grateful for my partner. I am grateful that my partner has a job that allows him flexibility on days I’m at an overnight birth when he needs to find childcare for the day.  On that note- I’m grateful that I have amazing childcare options, a must in this kind of work.
I am grateful that hospital policies seem to be following evidence lately.  The shift towards even more mother/baby friendly care is heartwarming to see.

Cuddly Kitty
Cuddly Kitty

I’m thankful for my house.  It is awesome.
I’m grateful for cozy fires, cuddly kitties, and yarn.
I’m grateful for Zachary!  Parenting a toddler can be a serious challenge, but the growth I feel as we go through everyday’s little tests is profound. His joy, curiosity, wonder, and spirit make everyday better!
I’m thankful to have found work that fulfills me. I never want to live to work, or work to live, but it’s great to have a job I love doing that fills me up.
I am thankful for my partner who totally understands that we might have to leave in the middle of Thanksgiving dinner so that I can go to a birth (or any dinner for that matter); who has been helpful and supportive as I put more time into make doula work work.

doula husbands
And for overlapping off-call time so our families can go camping together!

I am grateful for care providers who trust women, their bodies, and birth.
I am thankful for all of the families who have allowed me to serve as witness and support during their pregnancy, birth, and postpartum.
I am grateful for horrible horrible dad-joke level puns that get me laughing no matter how hard a day it’s been.
Happy Thanksgiving from our families to yours!

Mother Interview: A Beautifully Healing Birth

vaginal birth after cesarean VBAC birth storyName (Age): Charity (34)
City: Dexter
Birth Location: St. Joseph Mercy – Menon, Miller & Midwives

 
SRS: When did you decide to hire a doula? Was it always in your plan, or was there a moment when you decided?
Charity: With my first I wanted and planned for an unmedicated birth but ended up having a c-section due to him being breech. So when I became pregnant with my second, just 5 short months after my first was born, I knew immediately I wanted an unmedicated vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC)! I knew hiring a doula would greatly increase my chances of that VBAC.
SRS: ring sling VBAC newbornWhat was the single most helpful thing a part of your birth team did for you while you were in labor?
Charity: Have confidence in me that I could have an unmedicated VBAC! 

SRS: Did you seek out a specific care provider when you knew you wanted a VBAC?
Charity: ​I didn’t seek out a specific care provider as I was already with a midwife.  I did take a class with Beth about VBAC’s which was extremely helpful!​
SRS: What two things do you wish you would have been told before you were pregnant?
Charity: Your baby only needs YOU! Be confident in yourself as a mother.
SRS: What do you wish no one would have said to you while you were pregnant?
Charity: You’re pregnant again? Wow, that was quick!
SRS: What is the most indispensable thing that you have needed as a new mom?Charity: Help with everyday household needs!
siblings meeting birthSRS: What were you not able to do while pregnant that you couldn’t wait to do again?
Charity: Sleep on my belly!

SRS: What was the biggest surprise with the immediate postpartum time?

Charity: How quickly I adjusted to having 2 little ones. And how much easier nursing was the second time around.
SRS: What other life event should have a “doula”?
Charity: Death.